TALK & OPINIONS BY SILVIO CANTO JR.

We discuss politics, sports and a few extras!

Archive for September 22nd, 2016

A look at the 2016 Texas Rangers headed to the post season

leave a comment »

Guest: Dave Michaels, DFW sports journalist and radio host……….we will look at the Rangers 2016 and how they stack up for the upcoming post season……….we will look at Nolan Ryan who ended his career on this day in 1993……….plus other baseball stories……

Click the link below to listen: 

Source: A look at the 2016 Texas Rangers headed to the post season 09/22 by Silvio Canto Jr | Baseball Podcasts

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 9:00 pm

Posted in Baseball

Tagged with

1966: Orioles clinch the AL pennant in KC

leave a comment »

6799b_lg

On this day in 1966, the Baltimore Orioles clinched their first AL pennant with a 6-1 victory over the A’s in Kansas City.   It was an amazing year for a very good team, as remembered by The Sun:   

After they had waited so long for American League pre-eminence, the Orioles seized it with a relative lack of drama.

Propelled by Frank Robinson’s awesome slugging (he hit .463 with five homers in his first dozen games), they jumped to a 12-1 start. Then, after a mediocre May, they went 44-18 in June and July. The Orioles held a 13-game lead at the end of that stretch, and the gap never fell below 8 1/2 the rest of the way, even as the club played middling baseball in August and September.

In those days of no divisional or league playoffs, the Orioles essentially spent two months waiting for the World Series to arrive.

Yet when they formally clinched the pennant in Kansas City on Sept. 22 — Palmer beat the Athletics, aided by a sensational diving catch by outfielder Russ Snyder — they did not take the moment for granted.    

The victory touched off a celebratory food fight that lasted more than an hour. Egg salad, chocolate milk and shaving cream filled the air. Players tossed fully clothed teammates, and owner Jerry Hoffberger, into streaming showers and swirling whirlpool tubs. A champagne-addled Johnson, who’d go on to manage the Orioles 30 years later, nearly drowned in 8 inches of water.

Powell cut off announcer Bill O’Donnell’s pants at the knee. An upended buffet table landed on reserve Charley Lau’s head.

“Most outlandish thing I’ve ever seen in my life,” Watt says.

Baltimore swept the LA Dodgers in October.   They returned to the World Series in 1969, 1970 & 1971.   The same team won the 1973 & 1974 AL East but lost to the A’s in the ALCS.    The O’s returned to the World Series in 1979 & 1983.   They also played in the ALCS in 1996 & 1997 plus more recently in 2014.

The 1966 Orioles were a wonderful team and put together a great record over 10 years.

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 4:30 pm

Posted in Baseball

Tagged with

1993: Nolan Ryan’s last game

leave a comment »

ryanfinal

What a game and I heard it on the radio.    Nolan Ryan pitched to a few Mariners, hurt his elbow and walked off the mound for the last time.   He couldn’t get out of the first inning!   This is how it was reported:  

“After throwing a 2-0 strike to Magadan, the Rangers’ right-hander said, ‘I knew I was done.’ He said he heard a pop and had a ‘burning sensation’ in the elbow after the pitch. He threw one more pitch, a final meager fastball, to confirm his diagnosis.”

Ryan left the game holding 53 major-league records, but also having given up a grand slam to Dann Howitt, the last batter Ryan faced, sort of: Ryan then went to a 3-1 count on Dave Magadan before leaving the mound. Magadan’s walk was charged to Ryan.

Sherwin added: “The night had a special atmosphere as most of the 40,184 fans anticipated Ryan’s final road start. He was given a standing ovation as he walked to the dugout before the game.

“Ryan was the last player out of the Ranger dugout in the bottom of the first, jogging to his position as the fans again stood and applauded during his warmup pitches.

“It was a late-arriving crowd. Ticket windows were reporting lines still five or six deep even when Ryan already was on the trainer’s table. The late-comers found Ranger reliever Steve Dreyer pitching.

“Flashbulbs popped with each Ryan pitch, especially when he faced Ken Griffey Jr. But it was clear this was not no-no-Nolan. His pitches were all around the plate, rarely over it. He threw 28 pitches, only 12 strikes.

“Ryan went 2-0 to Magadan, then threw his fateful pitch. He threw one more ball, walked down the mound and called for the trainer. It was just the third time in his career he exited a game without retiring a batter.”

And I heard it on the radio!

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 3:00 pm

Posted in Baseball Hall of Fame

Tagged with

Happy # 89 to the one and only Tommy Lasorda

leave a comment »

tommy-lasorda

We say happy # 89 to Tommy Lasorda, one of the all time great baseball personalities.

Lasorda broke with the Dodgers in 1954 and played a couple of seasons.   His overall record was 0-4.

We remember him as the manager of the Dodgers:  1,599 wins, World Series champs in 1981 & 1988, NL champs in 1977 & 1978 plus NL West divisional champs in 1983 & 1985.

Lasorda was also one of the game’s greatest ambassadors:

https://read.amazon.com/kp/card?asin=B00UQY9Y0C&preview=inline&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_RY84xbEMGT1EA

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 8:30 am

Happy # 60 Debby Boone

leave a comment »

 

We say happy # 60 to Debby Boone……..

her song “You light up my life” was # 1 for 8 weeks in 1977.    It was one of the biggest hits in pop history.       

Her father was Pat Boone who had a ton of hits and movies in the 1950’s.    

Debby had a # 1 country song in 1980 and recorded Christian music over the years.    She is married, has a few kids and enjoying getting older like the rest of us.

Happy # 60 to a very neat lady!

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 7:00 am

Posted in Pop music

Tagged with

Does a city burn every time?

leave a comment »

charlotte-riot-i-85-looing-burning-400x250

(My new American Thinker post)

We all woke up to another riot, more looting and more police officers hurt. It happened in North Carolina, as we see in this report:

Charlotte police warned 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott again and again to drop his handgun before an officer shot and killed him, the police chief announced Wednesday morning, after riots damaged patrol cars and injured at least 16 officers.

Police Chief Kerr Putney said during a news conference that officers were searching for a suspect Tuesday when they saw Scott exit a vehicle with a handgun at an apartment complex on the city’s northeast side. “The officers gave loud, clear verbal commands which were also heard by many of the witnesses. They were instructing the subject, once he got out of the vehicle, to drop the weapon… Mr. Scott exited his vehicle armed with a handgun as the officers continued to yell at him to drop it.”

Putney said Officer Brentley Vinson shot Scott because the man posed a threat. Vinson is black, as was Scott.

A woman claiming to be Scott’s daughter said in a video posted on Facebook that her father was unarmed and had a book, not a gun. Police say they found no book at the scene.

The police chief said officers requested medical help and performed CPR on Scott. Vinson has been placed on administrative leave while the shooting is investigated, police said. He’s been with the department for two years.

As always, I withhold judgement on these incidents until we have a full report. Ferguson certainly turned out to be a lot different once a report was issued.   In other words “hands up don’t shoot” never actually happened.

So we will wait for the facts to emerge before we say this or that about the police officer’s behavior.

We can say a couple of things that go on beyond this incident:

1) Are we now at a point in our history where people loot stores or hurt officers just because someone tells them a black man was shot by a police officer? In this case, the police officer is black but that does not matter, apparently. Do facts matter anymore?

2) Who organizes these riots? They certainly happen rather quickly. Don’t these people looting have lives or jobs to attend to? It sure seems to me that there lots of people just waiting for the text to go out and do some damage.

3) How are we going to get people to serve in our police forces after these incidents? How can we expect men and women, of diverse races, to go out and put themselves under this kind of second guessing and ruthless scrutiny? Who cares about blue lives and the families that they go to every day?

It is a horrible situation and the country yearns for a leader who will stand up for the rule of law not go on black radio talks shows to energize an unenergized base.

P.S. You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

 

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 6:12 am

1862: President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation

leave a comment »

 

On this day in 1862, President Lincoln issued The Emancipation Proclamation:  

In July 1862, Lincoln informed his cabinet that he would issue an emancipation proclamation but that it would exempt the so-called border states, which had slaveholders but remained loyal to the Union. His cabinet persuaded him not to make the announcement until after a Union victory. Lincoln’s opportunity came following the Union win at the Battle of Antietam in September 1862. 
On September 22, the president announced that slaves in areas still in rebellion within 100 days would be free.
On January 1, 1863, Lincoln issued the final Emancipation Proclamation, which declared “that all persons held as slaves” within the rebel states “are, and henceforward shall be free.” The proclamation also called for the recruitment and establishment of black military units among the Union forces. An estimated 180,000 African Americans went on to serve in the army, while another 18,000 served in the navy.
After the Emancipation Proclamation, backing the Confederacy was seen as favoring slavery. It became impossible for anti-slavery nations such as Great Britain and France, who had been friendly to the Confederacy, to get involved on behalf of the South. The proclamation also unified and strengthened Lincoln’s party, the Republicans, helping them stay in power for the next two decades.

It was a controversial move.    President Lincoln then fought for the 13th Amendment that ended slavery in the US in 1865. 

https://read.amazon.com/kp/card?asin=B000MGAU9I&preview=inline&linkCode=kpe&ref_=cm_sw_r_kb_dp_NjV4xbBGQ4G21

Written by scantojr

September 22, 2016 at 6:06 am